2012 Guide to Singapore Government Funding and Incentives for the Environment

May 30, 2012 by  
Filed under Insights

Updated 2015 Guide to Singapore Government Funding and Incentives for the Environment

Singapore is well-known as a clean and green city with the government striving for environmental sustainability while growing the economy. The government has also identified Environmental and Water Technologies (EWT) including Clean Energy as strategic areas where Singapore has a competitive edge and which could generate future economic growth.

To accelerate the growth of the environmental industry and to maintain Singapore’s image as a City in a Garden, the government has initiated several funding and incentive schemes related to energy efficiency, clean energy, green buildings, water and environmental technologies, green transport and shipping, waste minimisation, energy and greenhouse gas management, and environmental initiatives and training.

The funding and incentive schemes are provided by government agencies such as:

To help businesses understand what’s available, we have compiled a list of 35 government funding and incentives for the environment:

  1. Energy Efficiency Improvement Assistance Scheme (EASe)
  2. Grant for Energy Efficient Technologies (GREET)
  3. One-Year Accelerated Depreciation Allowance for Energy Efficient Equipment and Technology (ADAS)
  4. Design for Efficiency Scheme (DfE)
  5. Singapore Certified Energy Manager (SCEM) Training Grant
  6. Clean Energy Research and Testbedding Programme (CERT)
  7. Energy Research Development Fund (ERDF)
  8. Solar Capability Scheme (SCS)
  9. Pilot Building Retrofit Energy Efficiency Financing (BREEF) Scheme
  10. Green Mark Incentive Scheme for Existing Buildings (GMIS-EB)
  11. Green Mark Incentive Scheme – Design Prototype (GMIS-DP)
  12. Green Mark Gross Floor Area Incentive Scheme (GM-GFA)
  13. MND Research Fund for the Built Environment
  14. A*STAR-MND Joint Grant Call
  15. Skyrise Greenery Incentive Scheme
  16. Sustainable Construction Capability Development Fund
  17. Water Efficiency Fund (WEF)
  18. Fast-Track Environmental and Water Technologies Incubator Scheme (Fast-Tech)
  19. TechPioneer Scheme
  20. Incentive for Research and Innovation Scheme (IRIS)
  21. Innovation Voucher Scheme
  22. Innovation for Environmental Sustainability (IES) Fund
  23. One-year Accelerated Depreciation Allowance for Highly Efficient Pollution Control Equipment
  24. Land Transport Innovation Fund (LTIF)
  25. Green Vehicle Rebate (GVR)
  26. Transport Technology Innovation and Development Scheme (TIDES+)
  27. Green Technology Programme
  28. Green Ship Programme
  29. Green Port Programme
  30. 3R (Reduce, Reuse, Recycle) Fund
  31. Environment Technology Research Programme (ETRP)
  32. Quality for Enterprises through Standards (QUEST) Programme
  33. Clean Development Mechanism Documentation Grant
  34. 3P Partnership Fund
  35. Infocomm Leadership and Development Programme (iLEAD) Expanded

If we missed out any funding or incentive scheme, do let us know. Thanks! Read more

Clean energy takes center stage this week in Singapore

November 1, 2011 by  
Filed under Insights

Clean energy discussions and solutions for the Asian region take center stage this week in Singapore as the annual Clean Energy Expo Asia (CEEA) 2011 Trade Fair and Conference begins today till 3 Nov, and is officially launched by Dr Vivian Balakrishnan, Singapore’s Minister for the Environment and Water Resources.

Jointly organised by the Sustainable Energy Association of Singapore (SEAS) and Koelnmesse, in partnership with the Asian Development Bank (ADB), CEEA is the leading platform in Singapore that gathers clean energy industry players and government leaders from around the world together to share and discuss knowledge, issues, technologies and innovative solutions that will help shape the future of clean energy in Asia.

CEEA Trade Fair and Conference

This year’s CEEA Trade Fair hosts about 170 exhibiting companies from 26 countries, with 6 country pavilions from Canada, Europe, Japan, Taiwan, Singapore and Switzerland. Exhibitors showcase clean energy solutions including solar energy, energy efficiency, biomass, biogas, biofuel, and electric vehicles.

The CEEA Conference will see over 130 international speakers share their insights on the future of energy through discussion topics on clean energy outlook, renewable energy technologies and commercialization, sustainable mobility, clean energy financing, project case studies, and energy efficiency. Read more

How Singaporeans Can Encourage Facebook to Unfriend Coal by Earth Day

February 4, 2011 by  
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Greenpeace is campaigning to get Facebook to unfriend coal by Earth Day, April 22, and Singaporeans can help to encourage Facebook too.

Greenpeace’s Unfriend Coal campaign wants Facebook to:

  • Increase the use of clean energy to make Facebook coal free
  • Develop a plan to make Facebook coal free by 2021
  • Educate users about how Facebook powers its services and its carbon footprint
  • Advocate for clean energy at a local, national and international level

Facebook announced last year that it is building a new energy efficient data centre to serve the hundreds of millions of its users, but the company plans to run it on electricity from burning coal, which is the most carbon intensive fossil fuel and also very pollutive. Greenpeace believes that Facebook can move away from coal and switch to clean energy, and influence the rest of the IT sector to do likewise. Read more

Launch of Low Carbon Singapore

May 20, 2009 by  
Filed under Insights

lcs-screenshot

Green Future Solutions has just launched our new website, Low Carbon Singapore, an online community dedicated to help Singapore reduce her carbon emissions and move towards the goal of a low carbon economy. Our aim is to educate individuals, communities, businesses and organisations on issues relating to climate change, global warming and clean energy, and to help them take action and reduce their carbon footprint through useful information, news, tips and resources.

Do take some time to browse around our site at http://www.lowcarbonsg.com. If you have any suggestions to make the site better or to report any bugs, do let us know. Thanks.

Singapore’s National Policies on Energy and Climate Change

May 14, 2009 by  
Filed under Insights

This summary aims to provide a brief overview of Singapore’s national policies on energy and climate change, and is divided into the following sections:

  1. National Policy Reports
  2. Energy Policy Group
  3. Singapore’s Economic Focus
  4. Energy Supply
  5. Clean Energy
  6. Carbon Intensity and Energy Efficiency

singapore-nightlight

1. National Policy Reports

The Singapore government’s policies on energy and climate change can be found in three national reports:

These three reports are essential reading for those who wish to have an overall picture of what the government is doing or plan to do on issues related to energy, climate change and the environment. There’s also another previous report worth reading – the Singapore Green Plan 2012 (2006 edition), published in Feb 2006.

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2. Energy Policy Group

Climate change and energy issues are complex and cut across different sectors and industries, and involve policies from different ministries and agencies. The Singapore government recognises the need to have an integrated approach to dealing with energy and climate change, and has adopted a whole-of-government approach led by the Energy Policy Group (EPG) since Mar 2006. The EPG consists of representatives from the:

  • Ministry of Trade and Industry (MTI)
  • Ministry of Finance (MOF)
  • Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA)
  • Ministry of the Environment and Water Resources (MEWR)
  • Ministry of Transport (MOT)
  • Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR)
  • Building and Construction Authority (BCA)
  • Economic Development Board (EDB)
  • Energy Market Authority (EMA)
  • Land Transport Authority (LTA)
  • National Environment Agency (NEA)

The EPG has four working groups on Economic Competitiveness, Energy Security, Climate Change and the Environment, and Energy Industry Development, headed by the different agencies shown below:

epg

3. Singapore’s Economic Focus

Singapore’s energy and climate change policies are influenced mainly by economic considerations. The government will take pragmatic and cost-effective actions to reduce emissions and adopt clean energy, as long as the actions does not affect our economic growth or add to costs greatly.

We can’t volunteer to take drastic measures to reduce emissions on our own, at the cost of our economy and our economic growth because this is not a problem which any country can do by itself. … We contribute less than 0.2% of all the carbon emissions worldwide – 0.2% – so what we do in Singapore is not going to change the world. … but we can’t say, therefore, we ignore it. We will do our fair share as part of a global effort to reduce greenhouse gases. – Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong

Energy plays an indispensable role in our economy, and will remain critical to our continued economic growth and development. The ultimate aim of our energy policy is to support Singapore’s continued economic growth. – National Energy Policy Report

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4. Energy Supply

About 80% of Singapore’s electricity is generated from natural gas piped from Malaysia and Indonesia. The remaining electricity is generated from fuel oil and a small percentage from diesel and refuse. The government understands that we are vulnerable to energy supply and price risks as we import all our oil and gas, and has taken steps to diversify our energy supplies.

To diversify our natural gas supply, the government has decided to import Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) and plan to have the LNG import terminal ready in 2012. This would reduce our reliance on our neighbors and increase our supply of natural gas from countries that are further from Singapore such as Australia, Qatar and Russia.

solarpark1In addition, the government is looking at other energy sources such as solar and biofuels, and is open to other clean energy technologies and will consider these energy technologies as and when it becomes viable for adoption.

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5. Clean Energy

The government has identified the clean energy industry as a key growth area since Mar 2007. The clean energy industry is expected to contribute S$1.7 billion to the GDP and create 7,000 jobs by 2015. The government has put in place several initiatives and funding to attract clean energy companies to set up their operations in Singapore and create jobs, and also to encourage research and development and test-bedding in clean energy technologies.

However, the government has made it clear that it will not subsidise clean energy:

Our basic policy tenet is that energy costs should be borne in full by end users. Individuals and industries should adjust their consumption of energy according to its true cost as reflected in its price. We do not subsidise the cost of energy because it will dampen price signals, and create the incentive to over-consume. … As it stands, renewable energies such as solar are still as some members have noted, much more expensive than traditional fossil fuel-based energy. To be consistent with our basic principles, we should not adopt measures which subsidise specific renewable energy types. – Senior Minister of State S. Iswaran, MTI

In Singapore, solar energy is the most promising clean energy source. However, the cost of solar energy generation is currently about twice that of energy generated by fossil fuel. In the Sustainable Development Blueprint, the government announced its plans:

We will invest early in solar technology test-bedding projects to prepare to use solar technology on a larger scale when the cost of solar energy falls closer to that of conventional energy.

HDB will implement a large-scale solar test-bed for public housing within 30 precincts islandwide, which will cost $31 million and provide 3.1 megawatts peak of solar capacity. This trial will help Singapore to implement solar technology on a larger scale when it becomes cost effective in the future.

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6. Carbon Intensity and Energy Efficiency

Singapore does not have a target to reduce absolute carbon dioxide emissions. Instead, Singapore has a national target to improve our carbon intensity by 25% from 1990 level by 2012 under the Singapore Green Plan 2012. We have already met the target and even exceeded it (read Singapore’s Carbon Dioxide Emissions Per Capita and Carbon Intensity).

Singapore’s key strategy to reduce carbon dioxide emissions is to be more energy efficient. The Sustainable Development Blueprint sets a target to reduce our energy intensity (per dollar GDP) by 20% from 2005 levels by 2020, and by 35% from 2005 levels by 2030.

To help Singapore meet the targets, the Energy Efficiency Programme Office (E2PO) is promoting energy efficiency in the various sectors through the Energy Efficient Singapore policies and measures (read the Overview of the Energy Situation in Singapore).

Image credit: garytamin; Energy Policy Group via National Energy Policy Report.

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