Identify and track key future trends with the Futures Centre

February 14, 2015 by  
Filed under Insights

Futures Centre by Forum for the Future

Futures thinking in Singapore is usually associated with the work of the government, which is well-known to make use of futures techniques and planning for identifying key trends, challenges and opportunities. Most local businesses and non-profits, however, are not familiar with the use of futures thinking in their work. But this could change soon with the launch of the Futures Centre in Singapore last week.

The Futures Centre, developed by global sustainability non-profit Forum for the Future (Forum) with support from EDB and other Forum partners, is a digital platform for decision makers to track trends, share resources and identify opportunities for sustainable innovation and collaboration. This free platform allows businesses and non-profits to tap into Forum’s futures knowledge. Read more

Identify and track key future trends with the Futures Centre

February 14, 2015 by  
Filed under Insights

Futures Centre by Forum for the Future

Futures thinking in Singapore is usually associated with the work of the government, which is well-known to make use of futures techniques and planning for identifying key trends, challenges and opportunities. Most local businesses and non-profits, however, are not familiar with the use of futures thinking in their work. But this could change soon with the launch of the Futures Centre in Singapore last week.

The Futures Centre, developed by global sustainability non-profit Forum for the Future (Forum) with support from EDB and other Forum partners, is a digital platform for decision makers to track trends, share resources and identify opportunities for sustainable innovation and collaboration. This free platform allows businesses and non-profits to tap into Forum’s futures knowledge. Read more

2012 Guide to Singapore Government Funding and Incentives for the Environment

May 30, 2012 by  
Filed under Insights

Updated 2015 Guide to Singapore Government Funding and Incentives for the Environment

Singapore is well-known as a clean and green city with the government striving for environmental sustainability while growing the economy. The government has also identified Environmental and Water Technologies (EWT) including Clean Energy as strategic areas where Singapore has a competitive edge and which could generate future economic growth.

To accelerate the growth of the environmental industry and to maintain Singapore’s image as a City in a Garden, the government has initiated several funding and incentive schemes related to energy efficiency, clean energy, green buildings, water and environmental technologies, green transport and shipping, waste minimisation, energy and greenhouse gas management, and environmental initiatives and training.

The funding and incentive schemes are provided by government agencies such as:

To help businesses understand what’s available, we have compiled a list of 35 government funding and incentives for the environment:

  1. Energy Efficiency Improvement Assistance Scheme (EASe)
  2. Grant for Energy Efficient Technologies (GREET)
  3. One-Year Accelerated Depreciation Allowance for Energy Efficient Equipment and Technology (ADAS)
  4. Design for Efficiency Scheme (DfE)
  5. Singapore Certified Energy Manager (SCEM) Training Grant
  6. Clean Energy Research and Testbedding Programme (CERT)
  7. Energy Research Development Fund (ERDF)
  8. Solar Capability Scheme (SCS)
  9. Pilot Building Retrofit Energy Efficiency Financing (BREEF) Scheme
  10. Green Mark Incentive Scheme for Existing Buildings (GMIS-EB)
  11. Green Mark Incentive Scheme – Design Prototype (GMIS-DP)
  12. Green Mark Gross Floor Area Incentive Scheme (GM-GFA)
  13. MND Research Fund for the Built Environment
  14. A*STAR-MND Joint Grant Call
  15. Skyrise Greenery Incentive Scheme
  16. Sustainable Construction Capability Development Fund
  17. Water Efficiency Fund (WEF)
  18. Fast-Track Environmental and Water Technologies Incubator Scheme (Fast-Tech)
  19. TechPioneer Scheme
  20. Incentive for Research and Innovation Scheme (IRIS)
  21. Innovation Voucher Scheme
  22. Innovation for Environmental Sustainability (IES) Fund
  23. One-year Accelerated Depreciation Allowance for Highly Efficient Pollution Control Equipment
  24. Land Transport Innovation Fund (LTIF)
  25. Green Vehicle Rebate (GVR)
  26. Transport Technology Innovation and Development Scheme (TIDES+)
  27. Green Technology Programme
  28. Green Ship Programme
  29. Green Port Programme
  30. 3R (Reduce, Reuse, Recycle) Fund
  31. Environment Technology Research Programme (ETRP)
  32. Quality for Enterprises through Standards (QUEST) Programme
  33. Clean Development Mechanism Documentation Grant
  34. 3P Partnership Fund
  35. Infocomm Leadership and Development Programme (iLEAD) Expanded

If we missed out any funding or incentive scheme, do let us know. Thanks! Read more

Understanding the Solar Landscape in Singapore with the National Solar Repository

August 11, 2011 by  
Filed under Insights

solarparkThe National Solar Repository of Singapore (NSR) was launched in Nov last year, and is administered by the Solar Energy Research Institute of Singapore (SERIS), the Economic Development Board of Singapore (EDB), Singapore Polytechnic, and Ngee Ann Polytechnic.

The NSR serves as a one-stop platform for those interested in understanding the solar landscape in Singapore. The NSR publishes a map and database of the solar photovoltaic (PV) systems installed at commercial, industrial and residential buildings in Singapore. Read more

The Use of Coal in Singapore

July 19, 2011 by  
Filed under Insights

coalHere’s an update on the use of coal in Singapore:

Tuas Power’s coal plant

Read the chronology of the clean coal and biomass cogeneration plant by Tuas Power.

Tuas Power’s new coal and biomass plant at Jurong Island would start operations mid next year, and the company has signed a contract with Indonesia’s PT Bayan Resources to supply 13.36 million tonnes of sub-bituminous coal over the next 15 years from Kalimantan, and has also struck a deal with South Korea’s Samtam Co Ltd to supply coal. Tuas Power is also concluding a deal for the palm kernel, which makes up the 20% biomass component of the plant feedstock (the other 80% is coal).

If a calculation is done only for the coal supplied by PT Bayan Resources, and excluding the coal from Samtam Co Ltd and the palm biomass, the combustion of 13.36 million tonnes of sub-bituminous coal would emit about 24 million tonnes of carbon dioxide (using the Greenhouse Gas Protocol’s calculation tool). Read more

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