Identify and track key future trends with the Futures Centre

February 14, 2015 by  
Filed under Insights

Futures Centre by Forum for the Future

Futures thinking in Singapore is usually associated with the work of the government, which is well-known to make use of futures techniques and planning for identifying key trends, challenges and opportunities. Most local businesses and non-profits, however, are not familiar with the use of futures thinking in their work. But this could change soon with the launch of the Futures Centre in Singapore last week.

The Futures Centre, developed by global sustainability non-profit Forum for the Future (Forum) with support from EDB and other Forum partners, is a digital platform for decision makers to track trends, share resources and identify opportunities for sustainable innovation and collaboration. This free platform allows businesses and non-profits to tap into Forum’s futures knowledge. Read more

Identify and track key future trends with the Futures Centre

February 14, 2015 by  
Filed under Insights

Futures Centre by Forum for the Future

Futures thinking in Singapore is usually associated with the work of the government, which is well-known to make use of futures techniques and planning for identifying key trends, challenges and opportunities. Most local businesses and non-profits, however, are not familiar with the use of futures thinking in their work. But this could change soon with the launch of the Futures Centre in Singapore last week.

The Futures Centre, developed by global sustainability non-profit Forum for the Future (Forum) with support from EDB and other Forum partners, is a digital platform for decision makers to track trends, share resources and identify opportunities for sustainable innovation and collaboration. This free platform allows businesses and non-profits to tap into Forum’s futures knowledge. Read more

What the green community could do better this year

February 8, 2015 by  
Filed under Insights

A week of interesting meetings and events, which got me thinking about what the green community could do better this year. Here’s 3 things:

1) Think Long Term

While green NGOs in Singapore depend heavily on volunteers with passion to drive their work, they must also consider long term career paths and capacity building to attract people to join the environmental sector. Besides requiring passion, creating a viable green career for passionate people is also important. Having full-time staff with relevant skills to drive the key work ensures continuity and better engagement with stakeholders.

NGOs could adopt futures thinking to identify key trends, challenges and opportunities. Thinking long term is not just for the government, NGOs should also think about how best to advance their causes in a changing Singapore with more diverse voices.

2) Have More Conversations

The green community is often busy working on their own causes and silos, without slowing down to speak to other groups in the community and find collaborations. The occasional meetups at events hardly enable proper conversations to develop.

We need to develop spaces where the green community can come together and have deep conversations to discuss, plan, collaborate and synergise. We also need spaces where the green community can have conversations with other communities, NGOs, businesses and government agencies.

3) Nudge the Government

We can help the government help the green community. Some government agencies need to see public support before setting certain policies. The green community can identify these potentials and work on campaigns to increase public awareness and support, so that this groundswell can nudge the government in doing their work faster.

Some government policies might be backwards in today’s evolving society and needs. The green community can proactively engage the government on these policies, with recommendations and constructive feedback.

Green Media Roundtable Discussion: Singapore and the Environment

June 24, 2014 by  
Filed under Insights

I was on the panel for the Green Media Roundtable Discussion organised by Green Drinks Singapore last week, where together with other environmental journalists and bloggers, we shared on Singapore’s journey towards sustainability – how far we have come these 50 years, and what else we can improve or focus on.

Here’s some thoughts that I shared at the discussion (with some additional remarks and clarification):

1)  Environmentalism in Singapore: Government and NGOs

I would divide the green movement in Singapore into 3 time periods: Before 2000 (Conservation and Protection); 2000-2010 (The Golden Age); and After 2010 (One Step Forward, 2 Steps Back). Read more

3 Scenarios For a Future Sustainable Singapore

June 8, 2014 by  
Filed under Insights

Futures and scenario thinking or planning is not about predicting the future, but is about understanding what is possible, encouraging conversations, and informing decision making. Futures thinking usually looks at trends related to PESTEL – Politics, Economics, Social, Technology, Environment, and Legal. What trends are relevant and predictable? Which direction is it moving and what is the impact?

Based on key trends and their effects, scenarios or stories about the future are then developed to better communicate what the future could look like. The intention is not to predict the future but to give a range of what is possible for people to make better decisions in the present.

Let’s take a look at some possible key PESTEL trends that we could see for Singapore in 2030: Read more